heap


heap
heap n pile, stack, shock, cock, mass, bank (see under HEAP vb)
Analogous words: *aggregate, aggregation, conglomerate, conglomeration: collection, assemblage (see under GATHER)
heap vb Heap, pile, stack, shock, cock, mass, bank are comparable as verbs when they mean to bring together into a more or less compact group or collection a number of things and as nouns when they denote the group or collection so assembled.
Heap is the least definite in its implications; it usually implies a moundlike shape and more or less careless or fortuitous arrangement; it may or may not imply a personal agent, an assemblage of like things, close packing, or a large quantity
{

throw all the discarded clothes into a heap

}
{

heap the sand in this corner of the lot

}
{

the miser gloated over his heaps of coins

}
{

the wind heaps the leaves under the garden wall

}
{

stacks of firewood were heaped all about the stove— Mason

}
Pile distinctively implies the laying of one thing or one layer on top of another in a more or less orderly formation; it usually implies a personal agent and an assembling of like things or things of approximately the same size or shape
{

pile magazines according to their sizes

}
{

a pile of letters on a desk

}
{

pile logs

}
{

a pile of bricks

}
Stack more strongly implies orderly and compact arrangement and the assembling of like things; it almost invariably suggests personal agency and a particular shape or form, and it has a distinctly restricted range of idiomatic reference. Thus, one stacks hay, straw, or grain in the sheaf into conical or a four-sided, round-cornered formation designed to shed rain; one stacks firewood by arranging the pieces neatly into a rectangular pile; one stacks arms when one sets up rifles so that they form a pyramid; one stacks lumber by so arranging it in a pile that air may circulate and warping be minimized
{

hay curing in the stack

}
{

a stack of lumber

}
So strongly does stack suggest care in arrangement that it carries specific connotations in some of its applications; thus, to stack cards is to arrange them secretly for cheating; a stack is in Great Britain a measure of stacked coal or firewood equal to four cubic yards. Shock and cock are the narrowest of these terms.
Shock is used primarily of sheaves of grain (as wheat, rye, or oats) or of stalks of Indian corn which are stacked upright with butt ends resting on the ground
{

when the frost is on the punkin and the fodder's in the shockRiley

}
Occasionally it, like cock, is used with reference to hay stacked in a conical pile
{

cock up the hay from the windrow

}
Mass (see also mass n under BULK) usually suggests amorphousness; it also implies either a capacity in the things which are brought together for cohering with or adhering to each other so as to form a blended or fused whole or a highly compact or dense agglomerate, or an external process which forces them to cohere or adhere; thus, a pasty substance used in making up pills and troches is called a mass by pharmacists; some flowers (as violets) tend to grow in masses or to mass themselves in growing; to mass colors in a painting or in stained-glass windows is to combine the various colors used in any one significant portion of the whole so that they seem to flow into each other and give a unitary effect when the painting or window is viewed in perspective. Mass, therefore, usually implies integration, but it may be a physical, a spiritual, an emotional, an intellectual, or a purely aesthetic integration
{

massed his arguments

}
{

compounding the American people into one common massJohn Marshall

}
{

dense masses of smoke hung amid the darting snakes of fire— Meredith

}
{

a vine, remarkable for its tendency, not to spread and ramble, but to mass and mount— Cather

}
Bank (the verb is often followed by up) is used chiefly in reference to substances which when affected by moisture, freezing, or pressure form, or seem to form, into compact masses
{

bank up the snow on each side of the path

}
{

bank up a sandpile

}
{

build a snowbank

}
{

cloud banks

}
{

the wiser heads in Rome, seeing the clouds banking in the North, had clamored for the employment of the ablest of Roman commanders— Buchan

}
Analogous words: *accumulate, amass, hoard: collect, assemble, *gather
Contrasted words: *scatter, disperse, dissipate, dispel

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Heap — (h[=e]p), n. [OE. heep, heap, heap, multitude, AS. he[ a]p; akin to OS. h[=o]p, D. hoop, OHG. houf, h[=u]fo, G. haufe, haufen, Sw. hop, Dan. hob, Icel. h[=o]pr troop, flock, Russ. kupa heap, crowd, Lith. kaupas. Cf. {Hope}, in Forlorn hope.] 1. A …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • heap´er — heap «heep», noun, verb. –n. 1. a pile of many things thrown or lying together: »a heap of stones, a sand heap. SYNONYM(S): mass, stack, accumulation. 2. Informal. a large amount; a lot; multitude: »a heap of trouble. It did me a heap of good to… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Heap — Heap, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Heaped} (h[=e]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Heaping}.] [AS. he[ a]pian.] 1. To collect in great quantity; to amass; to lay up; to accumulate; usually with up; as, to heap up treasures. [1913 Webster] Though he heap up silver as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Heap — may refer to:In computer science: * heap (data structure), a tree like data structure * The heap (or free store ) is the area of memory used for dynamic memory allocationIn mathematics: *a heap (mathematics) is a generalization of a group.In… …   Wikipedia

  • heap — [hēp] n. [ME hepe, a troop, heap < OE heap, a troop, band, multitude, akin to Ger hauf(en), Du hoop < IE * keub < base * keu , bend, arch > HOP1, HIVE] 1. a pile, mass, or mound of things jumbled together 2. [often pl.] Informal a… …   English World dictionary

  • Heap — (englisch „Haufen“) steht für: eine Datenstruktur, siehe Heap (Datenstruktur) einen speziellen Speicherbereich, siehe Dynamischer Speicher Heap ist auch der Name von folgenden Personen Imogen Heap (* 1977), Sängerin, Komponistin, Musikerin und… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • heap — ► NOUN 1) a pile of a substance or of a number of objects. 2) informal a large amount or number: heaps of room. 3) informal an untidy or dilapidated place or vehicle. ► VERB 1) put in or form a heap. 2) (heap with) load copiously with …   English terms dictionary

  • heap|y — «HEE pee», adjective, heap|i|er, heap|i|est. forming a heap or heaps: »White heapy clouds, looking like balls…bring no rain (New Yorker) …   Useful english dictionary

  • heap — [n] pile, accumulation abundance, agglomeration, aggregation, a lot*, amassment, assemblage, bank, batch, bulk, bunch, bundle, cargo, clump, cluster, collection, concentration, congeries, deposit, fullness, gathering, gobs*, great deal, harvest,… …   New thesaurus

  • heap — index assemblage, bulk, collection (accumulation), hoard (noun), hoard (verb), plethora, quantity …   Law dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.